Will Playing Hard-to-Get Help You Land Your Dream Job??


Well… it really depends! Let’s keep this short and sweet though.

For the sake of simplicity, let’s use a metaphor anyone can relate to: relationships. Finding a job is like dating; both process are driven by people. Can playing hard to get help you in dating? Yes. But it can also ruin your chances! So, as with just about everything else in life, it’s all about balance.

The point of playing hard-to-get is to communicate that you are wanted and have other options; it gives you value in other’s eyes. This works with finding a job. Why would a company want you if no one else wants you? If you had valuable skills then other companies would want you too, right? So whether you do or don’t, act like you have options!

Ask insightful questions, like what the work environment is like, what people like about working at this company, the reason the last person left, the kinds of tasks you will get to do in this position (you want your work to be interesting!)… Things someone who is deciding between several options would take into account.

Yes, it sounds simplistic and silly, but HR, recruiters and hiring managers are all people too. Life lessons permeat all of our actions, including what we do at work.

There is a flip side to take into account: pulling too far and losing it altogether. Just like in dating, you can play too hard-to-get. Make your interviewer think you’re not interested and just wasting their time, and they won’t take you seriously.

So how do you avoid doing that? Don’t act disdainful, like you’re too good for the job. That’s one of the biggest tip-offs someone won’t take the position in the end, and a recruiter is looking for the best person for a position, so why would s/he waste his time on someone who obviously is not interested?

Another large hint is when a candidate asks about money too early; it can foretell problems in negotiating money. Sometimes candidates try to get as much as possible, so much so that they end up asking for too much and end up losing the job. If you’re sure you can find a company who will pay you for, then great! But if not…. then you might not want to ask about money too early.

The point to remember is that this whole process is driven by people: the candidate, the recruiter, HR, recruiting managers… It’s the biggest variable to keep in mind. Keep your sights on your interactions with you interlocuteur(s) and you will be that much closer to getting that dream job!

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Why HR is Rejecting Your Resume


Who WOULDN’T hire this ?!

Yeah, it sucks. Even worse: recruiters / hiring managers / HR usually aren’t willing to give you a straight answer since you might try to argue with them or sue.

So what are the reasons your resume isn’t getting you anywhere? Well, you just don’t fit the profile! But what is this profile?

  1. Experience: Do you have the skills asked for in the ad?
  2. Seniority: Do you have way more or less experience than they’re looking for?
  3. Loyalty: Do you skip around from job to job every 6-12 months? This may indicate to a hiring manager that you’re not going to stay at their company long. Hiring and training someone costs $$ so they’re hesitant to to spend it on someone who’s going to leave after only 1 year.
  4. Consistency: Do you have a 5+ month gap without a job? This might make who ever is reading your resume wonder whether there is an important reason you had so much difficulty finding another job.
  5. Communication: Many job ads now cite written and verbal communication as skills they want. While you can’t do much about verbal communication until you’ve got someone on the phone, the email(s) you send can have a huge impact! Do you have obvious grammatical mistakes? Use a lot of slang or unprofessional language? Type in all caps? All of these reflect on your written communication style and aptitude.
  6. Miscellaneous Requirements: Is this position only for locals (no budget for relocation)? For candidates with a university degree? All these and other factors go into the decision whether or not to consider interviewing you.
  7. Silly Mistakes: I’m not talking about grammatical mistakes here (although a very poor grasp of English grammar can be worrisome… ) Did you send a blank email with no message or attachment?
  8. Email Filter: Have you been checking your spam filter? Recruiters send a lot of emails out everyday so sometimes our messages end up in your junk folder.

What it comes down to is, someone has a very specific profile in mind and the minions reading the resumes and sending out sad rejection emails (or not — another post coming on that soon) are bound by that. So please, don’t shoot the messenger. Just read this post and ask Q’s!

Ways to counterbalance some of these are coming in another post soon =]

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